Portsdown U3A

Book Club

 

Book pic

 

Book Club

HOW DOES IT WORK?
Like many reading groups we order sets of books from the Central Library , where the list of titles is updated periodically. Having read our book during the month we then discuss it at our meeting. Simple!
WHAT  SORT OF BOOKS DO YOU READ?
The library list focuses primarily on modern novels – often prize winning titles – but also includes some  older classics and a few  non-fiction books.
WHEN  AND WHERE DO YOU MEET?
We meet on the second Thursday of each month at 2 p.m., normally at Pam Hennessy’s house but occasionally at another member’s place.
HOW LARGE IS THE GROUP?
We have 13 members at present and could accommodate a maximum of 15. Sets of books from the library comprise no more than 15 copies and discussion is difficult with too large a group. As more people show interest in the group there is always  the possibility of setting up a  second group.

 

Excerpt from the July Newsletter

 

Book Club
“Of making many books there is no end,  and much study is a weariness of the flesh .” (Ecclesiastes 12,12) So we have been warned!
And I suppose some of the books we read can be quite hard work, but there are also those which are primarily amusing and entertaining , such as Elizabeth von Arnim’s  “The Enchanted April” which brings together a number of ladies from different backgrounds to share a holiday in an idyllic location. Other books make us think about more serious issues : the theme of race relations figures in both Monica Ali’s “Brick Lane” and, in a different setting, in Fannie Flagg’s “Fried Green Tomatoes at the  Whistle Stop Cafe” : very different angles on an important issue. Recently we have read two novels about painters – Margaret Forster’s “Keeping the World Away ” and Patrick Gale’s  ” Notes from an Exhibition”. Both pose the question as to whether a normal family life is compatible with a whole-hearted devotion to one’s art. What do YOU think? Sometimes we end up reading a novel which we might never have selected from the library shelves , such as “The Grease Monkey’s Tale” by Paul Burman, with its many mysterious characters and sinister conspiracies . “Truth is a matter of perspective” , says one of the characters. But is it?
Whatever we read, there always seems to be plenty to discuss – and disagree about!
Diana Warren

 

Check out our report from last year

Book Club 2014

 

Group Co-ordinator : Diana Warren
Email: contact@portsdownu3a.org.uk